Identity – Lecrae

“I’m not the shoes I wear,

I’m not the clothes I buy,

I’m not the house I live in,

I’m not the car I drive,

I’m not the job I work,

You can’t define my worth,

By nothing on God’s green earth,

My identity is found in Christ..”

Artist: Lecrae

Song: Identity

Where do you find your identity?

S.O – Give it to God

“No-one knows you when you’re down!”

This song first struck me the second time I listened to it on S.O’s latest album ‘So It Ends.’ I guess I paid more attention to the lyrics and overall picture that it paints.

The calm melodious chorus asks a personal question of our response to life’s trials; What is our default response when things go wrong?

CHORUS

“Where do you run to when the doors close off?

And who do you call on when it all goes wrong?

The devil is telling me to feed my fear;

‘Why don’t you pack your bags and disappear?’

I’d rather give it to God”

Life is such an unpredictable thing. We make plans, visualise our ideal outcomes and start moving towards those goals. But trial after trial, tragedy after tragedy and we’re back down on our knees. “It was never meant to be like this,” we think.

 The bible sympathises with us and offers hope through Jesus. In James 1:12, it says this:

Blessed is the man who remains steadfast under trial, for when he has stood the test, he will receive the crown of life, which God has promised to those who love him. (James 1:12)

And Jesus himself offers rest through life’s challenges when he says this:

“Come to me all who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest.” (Matthew 11:28)

Guvna B – Nothing but the blood

Hello all! And a very happy (rather belated) Easter to you all. Hope this message finds you well. As its been a while since my last post, I thought rather than blabber on about something, I’ll simply share a song I’ve been listening to recently – ‘Nothing but the blood, by Guvna B’. This awesome hip-hop rendition samples the original hymn with the same title by Robert Lowry (1826-99) – a songwriter who wrote around 500 hymns.

Check out Guvna B’s full album on iTunes called ‘Secret World’.

Peace 😃

J.Miles – Love Letters (ft Leah Smith)

A simple yet necessary message that the world needs to hear.

I only discovered this song this evening and absolutely love it. I’ve loved listening to Leah Smith‘s music for a while, with her other hits ‘By land or by sea’ and ‘Beautifully made’ among my favourites. Her amazing voice effortlessly delivers the simple yet necessary message that Jesus loves you!

As for J.Miles, this was my first time hearing him, but what better way to be introduced to him. I found his lyrics deep and thought provoking, but easy enough to follow without having to look up the lyrics. The combination of singer and rapper has been used beautifully in this one.

Have a listen…

S.O. – So It Ends

In the world of Christian hip hop music, the release of S.O’s much anticipated album (so it ends) will be greatly welcomed. Following his previous releases (so it begins, so it continues), the lyrical content has always sought to tell the world about Jesus, and offer an alternatively positive message in hip hop. He’s signed onto the Lamp Mode label whose overall mission is to shine light into a dark world with their music. Have a listen, check the album out on iTunes. I’d highly recommend it (I’ve had a listen). Peace 🙂

MySpace – by Flame (Careful what you post)

Old But Pure Gold!


Back in the days when social media was still in its relative infancy, US Christian rapper Flame came onto the music scene with his self titled debut album ‘FLAME’ (2004). With early hits like ‘To my Heart’ and ‘Racial Diversity’, he really brought a challenging but (rarely seen) positive dimension to the hip hop movement. On his third album (Our World: Fallen), he delivered the hit MySpace, which looked at why we post what we do on social media. Its a story that is still relevant today (except its not MySpace, Bebo or Hi5. Instead its Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Pintrest and so much more). Despite the changing times, however, one thing remains the same as we still (almost exclusively) share our “best self” on social media. The story in this song is that of young Chanté Andrea Jones, whose feeling down and lonely because she’s not being shown love at home.

“Young Chanté Andrea Jones, never met her father and mama’s never home,

Plus she’s 15 and she lies about her age. She’s always on her phone or her Myspace page.”

(Flame – MySpace ft. Diamone)

In search of acceptance, she turns to her so-called online friends (some who she knows, others she doesn’t). What follows is a series of messages with a guy she doesn’t know, things escalate and before you know it they are meeting up face to face. I won’t spoil it too much (I probably have already, sorry), but ultimately the message is to be careful what we share online. We don’t know who we are inviting into our lives without knowing it. Have a listen to his thoughts in this thought provoking, lyrically sound and pretty sick tune (UK slang – google it) 😛


©2007

Song: Myspace

Artist: Flame (feat. Diamone)

Album: Our World: Fallen

Letter to Hip Hop

Abstract: The outpouring of lyrical poetry, fused with slick, well crafted, and hefty beats. That’s my definition of hip hop, a genre of incredible power and influence (some positive, some negative). In this video, US rapper ‘Bizzle’ reflects on and challenges some of the things that mainstream hip hop teaches us. I’d highly recommend listening even if you’re not a big hip hop fan.


I’m an ardent lover of hip hop/rap music. At it’s best, its blissful beats, charming melodies and poetic artistry make it so easy and delightful to listen to. It has historically been praised for helping break down racial and ethnic divides in the USA and has brought about lots of other positive change over time. Having grown up in what I would call a ‘hip-hop generation,’ it is clear that it’s power and influence are not always a good thing. We are all products of our environments and a big part of youth culture today is influenced by hip hop. Rap videos are typically filled with ‘mob-like’ groups of men either flashing weapons or giving off that impression as a symbol of their power. The overuse of sexual references coupled with rappers that would appear to be defined by what they have (e.g. expensive cars, jewellery, etc) are also typical characteristics that form the marketable hip hop artist/video. One of my favourite positive rappers, Jahaziel, paints a lovely picture in his rhymes of the kind of impact that our background, surroundings and personal choices have on us when he says this:

“They say some things are taught, some things are caught, some things are said, some things are thought, we all absorb stuff that we’ve grown around, that’s how it goes around.” (Song: ‘Round and Round’ – by Jahaziel)


The danger, I feel, with the single perspective portrayed by hip hop is that it affects young minds that grow up wanting that same lifestyle – the life of a hustler – even though the harsh realities of ‘ghetto life’ or working in the music industry would frighten the majority of us that buy into it. Hip hop repeatedly pushes messages through our moral and value filters and can get our heads bopping whether we agree with the lyrics or not (this might include how we view women, treat money, or even see God). It affects how we dress, who we hang out with, how we think and in a nutshell who we are. Another of my favourite rappers, ‘Shai-Linne’ (pronounced ‘Shy Lynn), summarises his view on why more conscience rap isn’t pushed forward by mainstream sources.

“The radio refuse to play stuff like this, cause they’re shady so they choose the unrighteous. They want your minds – vain guys long for power. Labels pay ’em to play the same five songs an hour. A lot ain’t even hot. In fact, I heard the same song so many times I almost forgot it was wack. When the same message is pumped repeatedly, maybe not immediately, but sooner or later the seed will be a tree.” (Song: Slow Down – Shai Linne ft. Eric)

We might not think that what we listen to affects us much, but in the same way that we are what we eat, we are what we listen to. I do hope this challenges you to think more about what your mind is absorbing however well articulated or nicely sounding. As much as I still love hip hop/rap music, I’m a huge advocate for more lyrically sound and conscience rappers like Lecrae, Shai Linne, S.O, Trip Lee, Jahaziel, Flame, Dwayne Tryumf and Guvna B to name a few.

Blessings 🙂